Planten En Bloemen http://www.plantenenbloemen.com/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 20:40:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/plantenenbloemen-150x150.png Planten En Bloemen http://www.plantenenbloemen.com/ 32 32 Installing a rain garden will help reduce the flow of water to storm sewers https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/installing-a-rain-garden-will-help-reduce-the-flow-of-water-to-storm-sewers/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 20:19:00 +0000 https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/installing-a-rain-garden-will-help-reduce-the-flow-of-water-to-storm-sewers/ EcoSuperior, Habitat for Humanity Thunder Bay and United Way of Thunder Bay are teaming up to build a rain garden.

PRESS RELEASE
SUPERIOR ECO
*******************

THUNDER BAY – June, July and August all recorded above average temperatures this summer. The months of July and August were also marked by much below average precipitation. As the days get hotter and drier, the conservation and proper treatment of rainwater becomes more and more important.

EcoSuperior, Habitat for Humanity Thunder Bay and United Way of Thunder Bay are teaming up to build a rain garden at the Habitat for Humanity ReStore located at 660 Squire Street. Rain gardens are perennial, bowl-shaped gardens that capture runoff from hard surfaces such as roofs and parking lots during heavy rains. Eco-friendly stormwater management features like this help naturally absorb and filter stormwater pollutants before entering nearby streams and rivers, recharging groundwater and protecting water quality.

“We are thrilled to be working with Habitat for Humanity and the United Way of Thunder Bay on this project. Before this rain garden, 100% of the runoff from the administrative building of the ReStore flowed from the downspouts directly into the parking lot and was lost in the ditches and storm sewers nearby. Now, some of this runoff is diverted to landscaped space on the lawn. This means less runoff overloading storm sewers during rainstorms and more water slowly seeping into the ground, as nature intended, ”says Julia Prinselaar, program coordinator at EcoSuperior.

Lana Vukelic, CEO of Habitat for Humanity in Thunder Bay, explains: “The installation of this rain garden is an example of how organizations, municipalities and businesses can work together towards a common vision for our community. . This business helps us learn together and has a direct impact on how we interact with water in our neighborhoods. “

Rain gardens come in many shapes and sizes and can be designed to complement a variety of cityscapes. For more information on how you can build your own rain garden, contact EcoSuperior.

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Here are the beautiful plant wallpapers of the Pixel 6 Pro https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/here-are-the-beautiful-plant-wallpapers-of-the-pixel-6-pro/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 18:06:00 +0000 https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/here-are-the-beautiful-plant-wallpapers-of-the-pixel-6-pro/

Every Pixel launch event is a user delight as Google is one of the best in the business at creating new wallpapers. It’s pretty normal for a new phone’s wallpapers to be stuck on the internet, but in the case of Pixel, new wallpapers usually leak before the new phone launches. This is the case with the Google Pixel 6 series, as last month we shared 12 new Pixel 6 Pro wallpapers that were rendered by the company to showcase the phone’s centered cutout. Turns out Google is planning to ship more wallpapers than expected, and they’ve already shown them to us.

When Google launched its big marketing campaign last month, they shared official renderings of the Pixel 6 Pro that demonstrated the phone’s support for the Material You theme. These renderings – which you can see below – feature two new wallpapers, one light-themed and one dark-themed, which the system extracts colors from to generate palettes for widgets, icons, and other parts. of the user interface.

These wallpapers were included in the Google Wallpaper Images app on the Pixel 6 Pro to which our source has access. Our source previously shared information about the phone’s hardware, including Google Tensor chip specs and charging speeds, and they’ve now shared these new wallpapers with us.

The new wallpapers are all photos of plants taken by photographer Andrew Zuckerman. Photos were taken of the following plants and are available in a light and dark themed variant:

  • Cattleya Orchid
  • Echeveria ‘Prince Bleu’
  • Hellebores
  • Butterfly orchid
  • Persian lily
  • Plush Protea

The description for each wallpaper reads: “Bloom one by one.” Grow together. “

Pixel 6 Pro wallpapers overview

Additionally, each color variant of the Pixel 6 Pro – black, gold, and silver – will come with one of three wallpapers by default. We have also included these three images, which each have a resolution of 1440 x 3120. The other twelve have a resolution of 2160 x 2400. If you want to use one of these beautiful photos of plants as your wallpaper, you can download the set from the link below. Thanks to our source for these shares!

Download Google Pixel 6 Pro Plant Wallpapers

]]> The Avenue – luxury shopping at American Dream Mall https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/the-avenue-luxury-shopping-at-american-dream-mall/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 17:04:32 +0000 https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/the-avenue-luxury-shopping-at-american-dream-mall/

Watch out for all the window shopping: this one is for you.

The American Dream mega mall in the Meadowlands has opened its luxury shopping wing.

L’Avenue promises more than just maximizing your credit cards – it’s a feast for the senses.

Anchored by luxury retailer Saks Fifth Avenue – its only location in the state – The Avenue also features a gourmet restaurant, a sculpture garden designed by New Jersey native Jonathan Adler, and intimate lounges.

Even the Dolce & Gabbana boutique itself is a work of art.

Interiors at The Avenue feature an exhibition of American art and fashion curated by Ree and Jason Willaford of Galleri Urbane in Marfa and Dallas, Texas.

Coming soon to The Avenue: Alexander Wang, Anne Fontaine, Brüt Champagne Bar, Gentle Monster, Jonathan Adler, and Zadig & Voltaire.

Here’s a look at what’s open.

Look inside the avenue at American Dream

The American Dream mega mall in the Meadowlands is opening a luxury boutique wing that promises to be a must-see experience, and not just for luxury designer brands.

America’s 50 Most Popular Chain Restaurants

YouGov surveyed the country’s most popular restaurant brands and Stacker compiled the list to give readers context on the results. Read on to browse the vast and diverse variety of American restaurants. Maybe you’ll even find a favorite or two.

15 iconic retail stores that no longer exist (but we totally miss shopping)

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This new technology turns poultry feathers into animal feed https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/this-new-technology-turns-poultry-feathers-into-animal-feed/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 10:32:26 +0000 https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/this-new-technology-turns-poultry-feathers-into-animal-feed/

Scientists in India have devised new technology that converts keratin waste such as human hair, wool, and poultry feathers into fertilizer, pet food, and animal feed. The technology was developed by Prof. AB Pandit, Vice-Chancellor of the Mumbai Institute of Chemical Technology, with his students. Newly developed technology offers an affordable and sustainable solution for treating keratin waste.

What is keratin?

Keratin is the type of protein that makes our hair, skin, and nails. It is also found in our internal organs and glands. It can be derived from the feathers, horns and wool of different animals and is also used as an ingredient in hair cosmetics.

What is keratin waste?

However, keratin is also the main waste generated when processing poultry from feathers, hair, scales, nails, etc. It is generally hard and difficult to hydrolyze. But the advantage is that it is inexpensive and contains over 85% protein.

Currently, tens of millions of tons of keratin waste are produced each year around the world; of which feather waste represents approximately 8.5 million tonnes. However, there is hardly any effective method for the recovery of waste keratin.

Keratin waste in India

India generates a huge amount of human hair, poultry feather waste and wool waste every year. Globally, around 8.5 billion tonnes of poultry feathers are produced each year, of which India’s contribution alone is 350 million tonnes.

Bad impact of keratin waste

Keratin waste is thrown away, buried, used for landfill or incinerated, increasing environmental risks, pollution and threat to public health. Waste also increases greenhouse gas emissions.

Keratin waste is considered an environmental pollutant and is mainly generated by poultry farms, slaughterhouses and leather industries. The major producer of keratin waste includes the United States of America, China, India, and Brazil which produce millions of tons of keratin-containing protein.

The technology developed by the Institute of Chemical Technology addresses the issue of keratin waste. Keratin waste is inexpensive sources of amino acids and protein, which highlights their potential for use as animal feed and fertilizer.

About the technology

The new technology is easily scalable, environmentally friendly, energy efficient, and makes liquid amino acid rich fertilizers that are more economical compared to products currently on the market.

In addition, it uses advanced oxidation to convert waste into marketable fertilizer and animal feed. The key technology behind this involves pretreatment followed by hydrolysis of the keratin using a technique called hydrodynamic cavitation, which involves vaporization, bubble generation, and bubble implosion in a flowing liquid.

Current chemicals and physical methods for such conversion are energy intensive, chemically hazardous, and involve multiple steps resulting in a higher cost of the final product. As calculated by the team, with this technology, the cost of the product in a large-scale factory, processing inputs of 1 ton per, is up to 3 times cheaper than the existing market product.

Advantages / Impact of technology

At a time when every possible effort is being made to achieve sustainable developments, new technology is a positive development to address environmental concerns, while also providing opportunities for animal feed.

Potential fertilizer: Keratin contains amino acids and proteins, making it potential candidates for plant fertilizers. Nitrogen fertilizers are easily digestible by plants.

Benefit for farmers: Additionally, advancing technology production will make liquid biofertilizers, which are three times more effective than the marketed product, available to farmers at an affordable price. Thus, it can help the socio-economic development of farmers and the country.

Sustainable solution: The technology developed by the professor and his team not only addresses the problem of keratin waste, but also recycles it to use the available proteins in a sustainable way. It addresses issues such as waste management, environmental pollution and degradation of soil fertility.

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The new Kaimuki Plantoem boutique captures the poetry of plants https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/the-new-kaimuki-plantoem-boutique-captures-the-poetry-of-plants/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 10:11:01 +0000 https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/the-new-kaimuki-plantoem-boutique-captures-the-poetry-of-plants/ Mahalo for his support of the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. Enjoy this free story!

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Fall care keeps plants and pollinators happy https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/fall-care-keeps-plants-and-pollinators-happy/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 06:37:30 +0000 https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/fall-care-keeps-plants-and-pollinators-happy/ As the weather and gardens shift from summer to fall, it’s time to adjust your maintenance practices to ensure the health, longevity, and beauty of your landscape. Proper fall care will increase winter survival, support pollinators, and reduce your future workload.

Continue to water as needed. This is especially important for new plantings and moisture loving plants. Do not neglect established trees during prolonged dry spells. Drought conditions stress these key landscape plants, making them more vulnerable to insects and life-threatening diseases.

Let healthy perennials sit for the winter. Many are home to pollinators and other beneficial insects, and some seeds provide food for songbirds. You’ll enjoy the added texture and movement in your conservatory and the songbirds stopping for dinner.

Remove diseased plant debris and those infested with plant pests. Removing them from the garden reduces the source of future infestations, which means healthier plants with less pest control required. Contact your local municipality for advice on removing pest infested plant debris.

This is also a good time to remove small to medium sized dead or diseased branches from shrubs and small trees. A saw, like the Corona RazorTooth 7-inch Folding Saw, is perfect for this heavy-duty job. The blade slides into the handle for safe transport and the small size makes it easy to store in your tool belt or bucket. Disinfect the blade with rubbing alcohol or disinfectant spray between cuts when pruning diseased plant material.

Don’t rake the leaves on the sidewalk this fall. Use them in the garden as a mulch on the surface of the soil to help control weeds, conserve moisture, and improve the soil as they decompose. The leaves also provide insulation and winter protection for a variety of beneficial insects and toads.

Continue to weed the garden. Cooler temperatures and a shorter to-do list allow more time to be spent on this task. Removing unwanted plants from the garden reduces competition with desirable plants for water and nutrients. Eliminating weeds before they produce seeds means fewer weeds to pull the next year.

Keep mowing the lawn as long as it continues to grow. Leave the clippings on the lawn to add nutrients, moisture, and organic matter to the soil. The value of a mowing season is equivalent to one application of fertilizer.

Do not rake dead leaves from the lawn. Just mow them while you mow the grass and accomplish two tasks in one. As long as the leaf pieces are a quarter or smaller in size, they will decompose, adding organic matter to the soil and not damaging the grass. Make a second pass with the mower if necessary to reduce leaf size.

After your last cut, clean and winterize your mower. Remove and sharpen the blades to be ready for next season. Consider investing in an extra set of blades so you can change them throughout the mowing season. Sharp blades allow for a cleaner cut for a nicer lawn that requires less water and a mower that uses less fuel.

Setting aside some time this fall to prepare your garden for winter will reduce the replacement and pruning of winter damaged plants.

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Parliamentarians and farmers dialogue on “localized” agricultural conditions | Local https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/parliamentarians-and-farmers-dialogue-on-localized-agricultural-conditions-local/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 23:12:03 +0000 https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/parliamentarians-and-farmers-dialogue-on-localized-agricultural-conditions-local/

“What is agriculture? “, Asked Agriculture Secretary Russell Reading at the farm breakfast hosted this year by Senator Jean Yo. The meeting took place on Friday September 17th in Harman and Luther’s barn.

Agriculture is a big industry in the country and a big industry in Pennsylvania. About 580,000 jobs are linked to agriculture in the state, according to the principal secretary. But the economics of agriculture cannot meet the needs of agriculture until they understand what the community means to them, Reading explained.

The reading provided a perspective that put farm workers first. “Help us define agriculture and we will break down the components of agriculture. “

Lawmakers have referred to their political efforts as explaining the key “factors” in the management of Pennsylvania agriculture. Senator Jean Yo, who organized and chaired the debate, highlighted his conservation assistance program designed to support local waterways and help farmers reduce nitrogen and phosphorus spills .

Yo also worked alongside Reading on the rewrite of the Fertilizer Act. The bill will reduce pollution of rivers by reducing the outflow of fertilizers from agricultural land.

Leadership is also in Pennsylvania that’s all A state with its own state-level farm bill. All other states follow the policies of the National Agricultural Bill. In other words, Pa. FarmBill provides a state-level perspective on the industry.

After hearing these plans, the farmers in attendance saw an opportunity to help define their relationship with the law, especially from a regional perspective.

A local farmer spoke to Yo about his concerns about local river management. Jean Roger, a farmer with a range of around 100 acres and a mile on Muncie Creek, had to deal with difficult soil conditions due to the flooded streams.

When the flood hit, it led to “a few feet of water all over the sediment in my field,” Roger said.

The problem isn’t just that the fields lose fertilizer in the floods, which is transmitted downstream and ultimately sent to the Chesapeake Bay. On the contrary, the weak infrastructure of the watercourse forces it to rebuild its soil foundations, including additional spraying, to compensate for the destruction of the watercourse by flooding.

Roger spoke enthusiastically about the maintenance of the feeds. He believes that measures such as dredging and rebuilding dikes can improve the local river system.

Another local farmer considered the role of the agricultural industry in creating pollution compared to other sources of pollution. “Every garbage disposal in your home or business sends a load of nutrients to the bay,” said Briarpatch Organic Farm founder.

He then went on to recognize the economic consequences of pollution, saying: “The reality is, it was always cheaper to send food waste and organic material to landfills than to compostable treatment facilities. And it was reused. ”

All the speakers, political leaders and farmers spoke about the importance of regional efforts. Recognizing that local waterways affect larger water systems, Yo said, “I’m focusing on what we’re doing with our own water here in Pennsylvania. “..

Reading introduced the theme of “stewardship,” a collaborative effort to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus emissions.

“Stewardship” has become a theme of accountability between groups, politicians and farmers emphasizing the many scales on which agriculture impacts, such as community, individual and ecosystem life.

Our content is free, but journalists work hard. 100% of your contribution to NorthcentralPa.com goes directly to helping us cover important news and events in our area. Please say local news is important!





Parliamentarians and farmers dialogue on “localized” agricultural conditions | Local

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Fall landscape maintenance keeps plants and pollinators healthy https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/fall-landscape-maintenance-keeps-plants-and-pollinators-healthy/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 20:04:45 +0000 https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/fall-landscape-maintenance-keeps-plants-and-pollinators-healthy/

As the weather and gardens shift from summer to fall, it’s time to adjust your maintenance practices to ensure the health, longevity, and beauty of your landscape. Proper fall care will increase winter survival, support pollinators, and reduce your future workload.

Continue to water as needed. This is especially important for new plantings and moisture loving plants. Do not neglect established trees during prolonged dry spells. Drought conditions stress these key landscape plants, making them more vulnerable to insects and life-threatening diseases.

Let healthy perennials sit for the winter. Many are home to pollinators and other beneficial insects, and some seeds provide food for songbirds. You’ll enjoy the added texture and movement in your conservatory and the songbirds stopping for dinner.

Remove diseased plant debris and those infested with plant pests. Removing them from the garden reduces the source of future infestations, which means healthier plants with less pest control required. Contact your local municipality for advice on removing pest infested plant debris.

This is also a good time to remove small to medium sized dead or diseased branches from shrubs and small trees. A saw, like the Corona RazorTooth 7-inch Folding Saw, is perfect for this heavy-duty job. The blade slides into the handle for safe transport and the small size makes it easy to store in your tool belt or bucket. Disinfect the blade with rubbing alcohol or disinfectant spray between cuts when pruning diseased plant material.

Don’t rake the leaves on the sidewalk this fall. Use them in the garden as a mulch on the surface of the soil to help control weeds, conserve moisture, and improve the soil as they decompose. The leaves also provide insulation and winter protection for a variety of beneficial insects and toads.

Continue to weed the garden. Cooler temperatures and a shorter to-do list allow more time to be spent on this task. Removing unwanted plants from the garden reduces competition with desirable plants for water and nutrients. Eliminating weeds before they produce seeds means fewer weeds to pull the next year.

Keep mowing the lawn as long as it continues to grow. Leave the clippings on the lawn to add nutrients, moisture, and organic matter to the soil. The value of a mowing season is equivalent to one application of fertilizer.

Do not rake dead leaves from the lawn. Just mow them while you mow the grass and accomplish two tasks in one. As long as the leaf pieces are a quarter or smaller in size, they will decompose, adding organic matter to the soil and not damaging the grass. Make a second pass with the mower if necessary to reduce leaf size.

After your last cut, clean and winterize your mower. Remove and sharpen the blades to be ready for next season. Consider investing in an extra set of blades so you can change them throughout the mowing season. Sharp blades allow for a cleaner cut for a nicer lawn that requires less water and a mower that uses less fuel.

Setting aside some time this fall to prepare your garden for winter will reduce the replacement and pruning of winter damaged plants.

Melinda Myers is the author of numerous books, including Small Space Gardening. Myers’ website is www.MelindaMyers.com.

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Drought tests centuries-old New Mexico water traditions https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/drought-tests-centuries-old-new-mexico-water-traditions/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 17:57:07 +0000 https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/drought-tests-centuries-old-new-mexico-water-traditions/

ABIQUIU, NM (AP) – At the edge of a sandstone outcrop, Teresa Leger Fernández watches the Rio Chama. The river follows a diverse landscape from the southern edge of the Rocky Mountains through rugged basalt hills, layers of volcanic tuff, and the red and yellow cliffs made famous by painter Georgia O’Keeffe.

Here marks the genesis of New Mexico’s centuries-old tradition of sharing water through irrigation systems called acequias.

It’s also one of many places in the arid West facing increased pressure as drought spans another decade and climate change accumulates with warmer temperatures.

Formerly acequia commissioner and now member of the US Congress, Leger Fernández knows how difficult it is to tell farmers they won’t have all the water they need – or maybe not at all.

She talks about the annual limpia, or cleaning the acequia in preparation for the planting season.

“There has always been a sense of accomplishment, but now what we are witnessing is that we can’t do it all the time because we don’t have water,” she said. said during a tour with acequia officials. “And what you’re all up against isn’t your doing, is it?” But you have to fight to make all the water available to work for everyone in the community. ”

Some earthen canals have not received a drop of water this year, another example of parched western conditions. Like many parts of the world, the region has become hotter and drier over the past 30 years, mainly due to increased levels of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases resulting from the burning of the coal, petroleum and natural gas development and transportation.

Boat docks are high and dry in reservoirs around New Mexico, and Lake Powell along the Utah-Arizona line is at an all time high this year. A key northern California reservoir that helps water a quarter of America’s crops is shrinking.

For the mayordomos – those who oversee the acequias and ensure an equitable distribution of water – it has become a rush.

Less snow falls and warmer temperatures melt it sooner. The dry soil absorbs the runoff before it reaches the streams and rivers that feed the acequias.

Paula Garcia, executive director of the Acequia Association of New Mexico, avoids the phrase “new normal” because she has said it involves the stable weather conditions upon which the community’s ditches rest.

“We try to be quick and adapt as much as possible, but it tests what we can really call resilience,” she said, standing in the shade of the Santa Cruz farmhouse and greenhouses in Espanola, where rows of chili, corn and blackberries cook in the sun. “We think we’re resilient, but up to what point? We come up against these tipping points. ”

Federal water management policies have complicated matters as the needs of cities and other users overshadow these Hispanic and Indigenous communities.

Their traditions are rooted in Moorish ingenuity brought first to Europe and then to North America via Spanish settlers. These ideas of water sharing were mixed with an already sophisticated irrigation culture developed by Indigenous communities in what is now the Southwestern United States.

What has developed are little corners of paradise, with gardens and orchards that have supported communities for generations.

About 640 New Mexico acequias still provide water to thousands of acres of farmland.

Darel Madrid, president of the Rio Chama Acequia association, has not grown a garden this year. He wanted to lead by example.

“It’s going to get worse before it gets better,” said Madrid, who would love nothing more than to grow watermelons again. “As long as we reduce snowpack and warmer springs, there will be a point where we can only rely on rainwater and the monsoon season. It’s gonna be bad.

After consecutive record dry summer rainy seasons, parts of the southwest have benefited from above-average rains this year. But the cards are still gloomy, with nearly 99% of Westerners facing some form of drought.

Madrid said some parciantes – or acequia members – are growing crops to supply regional farm-to-table programs and farmers’ markets. Others do it to subsidize income in an area where many live on the brink of poverty.

When water-sharing agreements involving some of New Mexico’s largest cities were first negotiated decades ago, Madrid said communities along Rio Chama were left behind. Now, as supplies are scarce, the acequias around Abiquiu have been forced to seek public funds to purchase water from downstream users. If there isn’t, they do without.

As long as Rio Chama sinks above 140 cubic feet per second, water can be diverted by acequias. Throughput generally plunges in May and rationing begins when it drops below 50 cfs. Aside from the isolated peaks of storm runoff, the flow is now less than half.

Madrid said the acequias would benefit from permanent water storage in an upstream reservoir, which would require federal approval.

“At the end of the day, we want to be self-sufficient,” he said. “We want to be able to take care of ourselves.”

Since 2017, more than $ 5.3 million has been funneled into dozens of community irrigation projects through the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission. An additional $ 15 million in public funds have been allocated to acequia projects since 2018.

Madrid said state and federal officials were starting to realize this as more acquias organized and spoke out.

Leger Fernández noted that the acequias represent some of the earliest previous forms of government in the United States.

“What we’re trying to do now is preserve something the parciantes, mayordomos and commissioners have been able to do for 400 years,” she told the group gathered along Rio Chama.

Part of this means reinventing acequias without giving up the sense of community they inspire.

At Santa Cruz Farm, owner Don Bustos grows crops in greenhouses in the fall and winter, when less water is needed and evaporation is reduced, he said.

In Taos, acequia chefs have postponed the annual cleanup until the fall so as not to miss the early runoff.

Madrid is reminiscent of a futuristic comic book story where an elaborate system of pipes and ration cards is used to control water. He hopes that never will, but he and others have recognized that acequias need to be improved to last another 400 years.

Garcia said she believes that farmers, masters of soil health and seed conservators will always be in rural New Mexico valley, they will only have to innovate.

“There are still a lot of adaptations that we haven’t tackled yet. We’re barely seeing the start now, ”she said. “We are dealing with ditches that are centuries old and in another century they might look very different, but I think we will always be there. ”

The acequias have overcome periodic environmental crises, rivalries between water users and profound historical changes, noted Spanish historian and anthropologist Luis Pablo Martínez Sanmartín in a 2020 research report. He said survival depended on a conception of the common good based on cooperation, respect, equity, transparency and negotiation.

Leger Fernández kept returning to ideas of community and mutual respect as she walked through rows of blackberries at Bustos farm, never missing an opportunity to pick another berry. She also talked about picking capulin – or Virginia cherries – and roasting blue corn to make atole – a traditional drink – to share while on vacation.

“To me, acequias are the most perfect symbol of what we should be: a community,” she said.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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A colorful personality transforms the apartment into a “welcome gallery” https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/a-colorful-personality-transforms-the-apartment-into-a-welcome-gallery/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 07:55:00 +0000 https://www.plantenenbloemen.com/a-colorful-personality-transforms-the-apartment-into-a-welcome-gallery/

Shot by Yang Di. Subtitles by Yang Di.

Shirley Zhao imbued her apartment with her personality and sense of style, reflecting her individual vision, wishes and desires.

It is a place where Zhao can show off his colorful personality, as well as a peaceful and serene space for his family of three. City life can be hectic and she wants a comfortable and relaxing environment for her family to enjoy together.

The Shanghai native moved to the apartment in Gubei district, Changning district three years ago. Her experience in finding a home has convinced her that it’s all about timing – finding the right place at the right time.

Courtesy of Shirley Zhao / Ti Gong

The relaxing sofa is placed against the wall covered with large “Blue Notes” on silk by German conceptual artist Ute Lindner, whose works are dear to many European collectors and museums.

“It’s like finding your other half, right? Indeed, it’s not much less important,” she joked.

Moving to this location was mainly because her daughter’s high school is only a block away. And a generous outdoor space surrounded by lush trees and plants is an added bonus, especially in downtown Shanghai.

“The high ceiling, a sturdy garden and abundant natural light from the large windows and doors made me fall in love with this apartment,” Zhao said.

White walls provide a perfect backdrop for her favorite artwork, furniture, and unique accessories.

“A number of white walls inspired me to transform the space into a ‘welcome gallery’,” she said. Zhao, who lived in Berlin with her husband Marc Tempus and traveled the world, moved to Shanghai in 2005. She created documentary films and events in Berlin, and founded the 4C Charity (Children help Children Charity Council) in Shanghai.

A colorful personality transforms the apartment into a

Dong Jun / SHINE

The “He” dining chair is designed by Italian architect and designer Fabio Novembre.

Her personal style for interiors changes depending on the country she lives in, the different stages of her life and the type of house or apartment. But one thing that never changes is that she likes to mix and match “Shirley’s temple”.

Shirley’s Temple means a place of Chinese and European antiques, traditional and modern designs, antique pieces and contemporary artwork, world famous artists and children’s art. She opened an international artist residency project downtown and invited 12 artists from various fields around the world to Shanghai. As part of the project, she hosted several exhibitions, art dinners and workshops.

“After closing the residency project, I chose unique pieces for my“ reception gallery ”. And with my collections that I have enriched over the years, almost every corner of this apartment generates an artistic and playful atmosphere. The mixture of cultures and the arts creates an atmosphere of love at home, ”she said.

A colorful personality transforms the apartment into a

Dong Jun / SHINE

A welcoming entrance is made up of a “Happy Buddha” painting created by Shirley Zhao’s daughter, Marlene Tempus, as well as a vintage sewing machine by Zhao’s German mother-in-law.

The generous layout of the lounges and dining rooms offers the perfect opportunity to exhibit its collections. Behind the mix of inherited antiques and contemporary art lie personal stories. Each object contains a story and is chosen according to its life path.

The opium bed in the center of the living space was a wedding present from her family, while she found an Art Deco wine barrel in Budapest.

Two uniquely redesigned Art Deco chairs enhance the “East meets West” vibe, and a ceiling painting in the living room was created by German concept artist Patrick Huber, well known for his “l ‘philosophy. art can fade and disappear “.

“Patrick is an old friend from Berlin, and when he visited my apartment he wanted to leave his’ disappearing work ‘here. When he looked at the high shaped ceiling, I immediately said’ I can move away the big lamp, “” Zhao mentioned.

A colorful personality transforms the apartment into a

Dong Jun / SHINE

The opium bed in the living room was a wedding gift from Zhao’s sister.

The result is a gorgeous piece created with light colored chalk.

“As the light colored chalk will fade over time and we plan to live here only a few years, the artwork will eventually fade away. And why not ? There is a Chinese proverb: “There is no permanent banquet in the world, ‘and this can also apply to works of art,” she said.

A special rug with a silhouette of the Shanghai Bund and a crochet “household help” sculpture by textile artist Patricia Waller adorn the hallway.

“Patricia is definitely the pioneer of crochet sculpture in the world. I was honored to have her among my artists in residence in 2016,” she said, adding that she was co-hosting her new exhibition at the Leo gallery on Wukang Road. this month.

A colorful personality transforms the apartment into a

Courtesy of Shirley Zhao / Ti Gong

A special rug with a silhouette of the Shanghai Bund and a crochet “house help” sculpture by textile artist Patricia Waller adorn the hallway.

The White Room serves as an office where Zhao spends a lot of time, is a peaceful sanctuary of white hues, flattering lighting, and stunning white artwork. It contrasts with the rest of the space which is playful and colorful.

“We like to relax in this room to read, to think, to be dizzy,” she said.

But even in this all-white space, Zhao prefers to layer different textures and funky patterns. Highlights are a pair of white textile installations in plexiglass boxes made by multitalented Italian artist / designer Monica Bertini.

“The unique, self-made pair of boxes contain so many elements ranging from the artist’s scraps of woolen yarn from her collection of designs to her understanding of the five Chinese elements and the sonic magnetic energy injected by a healer. spiritual recognition during the process of artistic creation, ”Zhao says. “No wonder these two works are so magical in this white room, giving it power and calm.”

A colorful personality transforms the apartment into a

Dong Jun / SHINE

Shirley Zhao enjoys spending time in the outdoor space surrounded by lush trees and plants.

Ask the owner

Q: What’s the best thing about living in Shanghai?

A: For me, a Shanghainese, going back to Shanghai not only means going back to the hometown that I know, but also seeing new things and new developments that are constantly emerging every day. The harmony between the old and the new is Shanghai and the unique culture of Shanghai.

Q: Describe your house in three words.

A: playful, clever, mix-match

Q: How do you relax?

A: Have a drink in my garden.

Q: Where do you spend the most time at home?

A: In the garden when the weather permits. Otherwise, my white bedroom or living room.

Q: What is the view outside your window?

A: Lots of green

Q: Where do you buy furniture from?

A: I bought furniture everywhere. The antiques were bought from local and European antique shops, while the more modern ones come from Italy and Germany.

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